For more than 15 years Da Angelo has been bringing authentic Italian food to Hobart.

The menu of tried and true favourites, mainly from the southern regions of italy, where pizza originated and where pasta is king, has been joined by some delightful concoctions devised by the partners, Angelo Fraraccio and Marco Caporelli.

In true italian fashion just about everything is freshly made on the premises.

(The exceptions are a couple of delectable ice creams, made specially for Da Angelo and appearing on the Dolce (sweets) menu.)

And if you want to know why the gnocchi, in particular, tastes so exceptional — it’s because Angelo’s and Marco’s mothers, Nicolina and Rita, come in each and every day to make it.

Ristorante Da Angelo, also in true Italian fashion, is very much a hands-on family concern.

Hobart’s favourite Italian restaurant is conveniently located In Battery Point’s main throroughfare — Hampden Road. It’s a five minute walk from Salamanca Place or 10 minutes from the city.

Locals say you can find it by following the source of the laughter, cheerful conversation, and tantalising cooking smells.

Ristorante Da Angelo
47 Hampden Road
Battery Point
Hobart 7004

t. 03 6223 7011

A proper pizza is a wondrous thing. Traditionally, a slab of bread dough topped with tomatoes and cheese and baked in a very hot oven, the Neapolitan pizza is beautiful to look at and substantial to eat.

In fact, pizza was the original fast food. Pizzeria originated in southern Italy and were places for a quick and cheap meal prepared right before your eyes.

How things have changed. Today a pizza is a dish with as many variations as chefs have imagination. You still have the fast varieties, terrific for takeaway, but they’ll have delectable and gourmet touches.

Such as pineapple. Why not, indeed? Just look at the Da Angelo pizza, one of the best-loved dishes on the menu — and there, in happy Italo-Aussie fashion is pineapple.

As for gourmet pizzas, they’re just what they say. Top with chicken and brie (Chicken Brie pizza), with pesto, salami capers and more (Caporelli pizza), with sweet chilli sauce and sun-dried tomatoes and on and on.

The sky’s the limit for these pies.

The families of Angelo and Marco, Da Angelo partners, come from the region of Molise, not far from Naples and reaching to the Adriatic where mountains and sea play hide and seek.

The highest point of the Apennines, snow capped most of the year, rises not far from the coast.

So scattered throughout the menu among your italian favourites, you’ll see some delicious offerings with names that will be new to you.

Macaroni Venafro is named for a little town, while Pizza Molise and Fettuccine Molisana recall the district; Spaghetti Basilicata is in honour of the mountainous region to the south. Pizza Frosolone is for the town the Fraraccio family lived in — there’s a Pizza Fraraccio too — and a Caporelli pizza, for Marco’s family name.

It’s not hard to pick out Pizza Da Angelo, a tried-and-true combination. As for Nicolina’s Special — very popular — it’s named after Angelo’s mother. The topping reflects not only Tassie’s superb seafood but also the great fish to be found along the Adriatic coast.

Do as the many Italians do and round out your meal, not with port or a liqueur, but a shot of grappa.

It’s clear, it’s colourless, it’s described as ‘a powerful spirit’.

Grappa is brandy that’s been made from marc — that is, what’s left after the grapes have been pressed.

Da Angelo has Grappa Bianca on their menu, and they also offer a caffe corretto — a short black with a dash.

Caffe corretto means just what it sounds like, “corrected coffee”. We don’t where the coffee in question went wrong, but this version has our approval!

It’s easy. Follow the rules — unlike English, they are simple and consistent. Unfortunately the pronunciation is sometimes quite the opposite of English, but the waiters in Da Angelo’s will always understand you.

The one that’s most confusing is the letter c

Followed with a, o, u it’s a k sound — as in casa, con, cucina

but followed by i it becomes ch — spinaci, ciao (and take a look at cucina again, which is ‘kuchina’)

and for ce — which is ch, as in Versace or dolce (sweet)

It’s the same for cc, which sounds as ch before an i — capucchino, fettucine

but is a hard k before a, o, u — as piccante (what we’d called piquant)

and sc followed by e or i reverts to a hard k — pesce (fish) as well as scusa

In other words, e facile (farchile), non?

Order a Sambucca bianco, and it comes Italian-style with coffee beans floating on top.

Well, that’s how you’d get it in Italy, and that’s how it’s served at Da Angelo.

Called Sambucca con mosce, it translates literally as Sambucca with flies. The crunch of black bitter coffee beans through velvet-smooth Sambucca is a taste and texture treat. Try it and see for yourself.

Traditionally there should be an odd number of mosce and and that’s why at Da Angelo there’s always three. No need to say in alarm, “waiter, there are flies in my drink”.

Cin cin.

“The angels in Paradise eat nothing but vermicelli al pomodoro.”
The Duke of Bovino
Mayor of Naples, 1930

Heavenly, but perhaps a trifle boring after a while.

Because pasta need never be boring, as there are countless ways of making it and serving it. (Just look at the sauces and shapes in this menu.)

Popular legend has it that Marco Polo brought pasta to Italy on his return from his expedition to China. However, gastronomic experts say the origins of pasta are lost in antiquity, dating to before even Roman times.

Elizabeth David has the last word: “there is pasta fatta in casa (home made pasta) and the kind that is mass-produced and dried in the factory.” She is very clear on which is the better. No contest, in fact.

Ristorante Da Angelo agrees.

Carbonara, much-loved pasta with bacon, eggs and cream, derives its name from carbone, or coal.

The miners of Rome used to take pan-fried pancetta (bacon) and egg with them when they went underground; at Da Angelo the original rough-and-ready dish is smoothed and silkened with a goodly dash of cream.

Tiramisu, that most wickedly rich, utterly delicious concoction of Tia Maria, sponge fingers, marscarpone and cream, translates as “pick me up”. Some people say it should be “lift me up”, something that would be hard to do if you have too much!

The families of Angelo and Marco, Da Angelo partners, come from the region of Molise, not far from Naples and reaching to the Adriatic where mountains and sea play hide and seek. The highest point of the Apennines, snow capped most of the year, rises not far from the coast.

So scattered throughout the menu among your italian favourites, you’ll see some delicious offerings with names that will be new to you.

Macaroni Venafro is named for a little town, while Pizza Molise and Fettuccine Molisana recall the district; Spaghetti Basilicata is in honour of the mountainous region to the south. Pizza Frosolone is for the town the Fraraccio family lived in — there’s a Pizza Fraraccio too — and a Caporelli pizza, for Marco’s family name.

It’s not hard to pick out Pizza Da Angelo, a tried-and-true combination. As for Nicolina’s Special — very popular — it’s named after Angelo’s mother. The topping reflects not only Tassie’s superb seafood but also the great fish to be found along the Adriatic coast.